Home Good Old Times Seven incredible cars from socialist Poland

Seven incredible cars from socialist Poland

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There is no social organization in which the need for luxury is so expressed as socialism. That diet of workers, peasants and honest intelligence from anything that is comfortably or aesthetically acceptable has resulted in great innovation in the creation of the same. The wish for “Better Tomorrow – Immediately” was motivated by the creators of these seven prototypes of the car. After all, why would not the shipyard worker in Gdansk have the right to drive Ferrari or at least something like

Smyk

As an inspiration for this urban little boy from 1957, BMW Isetta and Zundapp Janus used a car that was difficult to pin down what the front was and what was the end of it.

Smyk
Smyk

Smyk had only one door and it was progressing. Their all-round front part would move to facilitate entry.

It was powered by a 349 cc engine that developed 15 hp. The maximum speed was 70 km / h. For some reason, this 470kg heavy foursome had, we would say an “osmosathean sweeper”: four speeds for the forward and four for the reverse. By 1959, 17 examples were produced.

Smyk
Smyk

For its dimensions and performance, Smyk “drank like a smoky” and spent 5.1 lb on 100 kilometers.

Fafik

Based on the photographs, one could conclude that this tros can fit into the urban legend that one American, seeing a Fiore asked the driver, “Did you do it yourself or assisted you”?

Fafik
Fafik

In 1958, workers of the motorcycle factory in Warsaw were preparing for the production of a scooter named “Wasp”. Many of the components of the future classic Polish scooter were used for Fafik.
Fafik
Fafik

This four-point miniature had only 270 kg, raced 70 o’clock and consumed 4.5 liters per 100 miles.

Warszawa 210

Warsaw was the Polish version of the Soviet “Pobeda” car. The original Soviet Union ceased to be produced in 1958, while Warsaw had survived until 1973. Its components could be found in the van until the mid-nineties.

Warszawa 210
Warszawa 210

Nevertheless, in 1964, a prototype of the successor who never entered production was presented. Still, if judging by the photographs he inspired the next generation of Volga.

Syrena 110

Syrena was a Polish national car, that is, he had a role to play in the seventies by the famous “Peglica”. By the mid-sixties of the last century, the “Siren”, as Poles love to do, was already outdated.

Syrena 110
Syrena 110

Since 1964, the heir with the 110 mark which was supposed to enter production in 1968 was prepared.

Syrena 110
Syrena 110

The original plan was to find a 845 cc engine and 40 hp under the hood. If all this happened, the new Siren would not only be one of the first drivers, but also a serious competitor to Western models such as the Simca 1100 and Renault 6.

Polish Fiat 1100 Coupé

Polsi Fiat 1100 Coupe
Polsi Fiat 1100 Coupe

Although this sports model was named Fiat, it did not have any direct connection with Torin. The complex agreement of the FSO manufacturer with Fiat enabled the Polish side to use Fiat’s name and technical solutions under certain conditions.
Polsi Fiat 1100 Coupe
Polsi Fiat 1100 Coupe

The 1975 design of the Lotus Esprit model had a Pezejca (Fiat 125) technology, a propulsion unit directly from Zastava 101, and a little bit of shrapnel in the X-rays X1 / 9. No wonder that in spite of its attractive appearance, it had only 55 hp and a maximum speed of 140 km / h. They say, the only prototype produced is destroyed.

Ogar

FSO Ogar
FSO Ogar

A prototype Saab sport line was born in 1977 and, unlike the cup, was saved. Although the Fiata 125 technology was once again part of the game, the big defenders talk about the ambitions of exports to the American market, in the event that an adequate engine is found.
FSO Ogar
FSO Ogar

The prototype has gone through 70,000 kilometers during the test and has scored the highest rating … of its authors.

Beskid

Beskid
Beskid

If workers’ protests, state of emergency and shortage did not shake Poland in the early 1980s, this car could be a futuristic export hit. This 3.5-meter-long car had an unusually low air resistance coefficient of only 0.29, and consumed 3.9 liters of fuel per 100 miles. By the end of the 1980s, he had almost entered the production of a powered engine from Fiat 126.

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